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How the Talmud Became a Best-Seller in South Korea

Posted on May 29th, 2017
By Ross Arbes for The New Yorker


About an hour’s drive north of Seoul, in the Gwangju Mountains, nearly fifty South Korean children pore over a book. The text is an unlikely choice: the Talmud, the fifteen-hundred-year-old book of Jewish laws. The students are not Jewish, nor are their teachers, and they have no interest in converting. Most have never met a Jew before. But, according to the founder of their school, the students enrolled with the goal of receiving a “Jewish education” in addition to a Korean one.

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Rembrandt's Great Jewish Painting

Posted on May 22nd, 2017
Meir Soloveichik for Mosaic


Not only strikingly beautiful, his painting of Moses holding the Ten Commandments also happens to be one of the most authentically Jewish works of art ever created.


As Jews the world over prepare to celebrate Shavuot, the anniversary of the giving of the Law, few biblical scenes are more appropriate to contemplate than the spectacle of Moses bringing the tablets of the Ten Commandments down from Mount Sinai. And, incongruous though this may seem to many Jews, no more appropriate image of the scene exists than Rembrandt van Rijn’s depiction of the prophet holding aloft the two tablets bearing their Hebrew inscriptions (1659). Not only strikingly beautiful, the painting also happens to be one of the most authentically Jewish works of art ever created.

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Modern-Day Moses: The Heroes Who Saved Ethiopian Jews

Posted on May 15th, 2017
BY TEAM BE'CHOL LASHON for myjewishlearning.com 


The heroes who endured torture and risked their lives to save Ethiopian Jews.


When he was 10 years old, filmmaker Avishai Mekonen walked from Ethiopia to Sudan and was eventually taken to Israel. As an adult, he began to wonder how that journey came to be and his research led to his newest project.

BL: Your first film focused on your own journey to Israel, how does this project differ?

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What is Lag B’Omer?

Posted on May 8th, 2017

 

Lag B'Omer is celebrated this year on Sunday, May 14


ToriAvey.com



Lag B’Omer literally means the 33rd day of the Omer. The Omer is counted for 49 days between the end of Passover and the holiday of Shavuot (derived from the practice of counting the days from the barley offering at the Temple to the day of the wheat offering on Shavuot, in the Torah). The holiday celebrates a break in a plague that is said to have occurred during the days of Rabbi Akiva. The Talmud states that the great teacher of Jewish mysticism Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai died on Lag B’Omer, and in modern times the holiday has come to symbolize the resilience of the Jewish spirit.
 
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This one woman show is ‘Not That Jewish,’ but it is that funny

Posted on May 1st, 2017
BY CATHRYN J. PRINCE for The Times of Israel


Award-winning comedienne Monica Piper tickles audiences until they cry with the bittersweet story of her life


Some may laugh in the face of danger; Monica Piper laughs in the face of the “the dark stuff.” And right now she thinks America needs to laugh more.

“It’s getting harder and harder, that’s for sure — but a funny way of looking at things is important, no matter how dire the situation is. And in our current political situation, if you can’t find the funny it can be even more stressful,” said Piper, who is currently starring in the one-woman show “Not That Jewish.”

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